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Browse our site for computer advice, troubleshooting tips and tricks, and information on how to prevent common computer problems so you can avoid bringing your computer in for repair.

This section was built for you; we want to give you the answers you need to keep you away from us for as long as possible! We know what it’s like looking for help with computer repair on the internet; you may end up confused, bewildered, or maybe completely dazed by the amount of computer repair information out there.

Send your computer, software, and general tech questions to DoctorZ@laptopmd.com today!

You have questions? That's understandable. Maybe we even have answers. So ask us anything. Anything at all. We'll try to answer to the best of our ability.

LaptopMD+ Blog

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  • iPhones, Apple, and the Right To Repair Bill

    by LaptopMD Posted January 25, 2018 in News, Newsletter

    Apple makes some pretty great phones. We should know, we get to see how many people walk in with broken iPhone screens all the time, and so many people wouldn’t have iPhones unless they were a great phone.

    However, it’s hard to not be frustrated at how anti-consumer some of their moves have been in recent years.

    Apple’s anti-consumer moves

     

    Planned Obsolescence

     

    The most recent anti-consumer move by Apple just recently came to light, with how they treated their older iPhone batteries. People talked about “planned obsolescence” all the time, even making jokes about it, but apparently, it’s been true the whole time. They are even facing lawsuits over it.

    To be fair, their reasoning for throttling older iPhone speeds has some merit. However, they didn’t disclose what they were doing which makes it pretty clear that they knew it was wrong. Also, unlike most Android phones, it is very difficult for a consumer to remove and replace their battery. Which would’ve mattered a whole lot more if they were open and honest about what is slowing down the customer’s iPhone (an old battery).

     Removal of the Headphone Jack

     

    The iPhone 7 had a big stroke of “innovation” as Apple would call it, which is a thinly-veiled way of saying it won’t be compatible with other typical products. While Apple and Apple-followers stuck to that line of reasoning, it’s pretty obvious that removing the headphone jack did not make the iPhone 7 better, but it did help Apple’s bottom line.

    Not only does it force people to get either the little converter attachment (that is SUPER easy to lose, meaning you need a replacement) or the Apple headphones. Or, if you want to get wireless headphones Apple owns Beats, which is a massively popular Bluetooth Headphone company. People might just move to wireless headphones – which is that innovation they like to reference – and buy a pair of Beats.

    There are plenty of other examples similar to this one – Macbooks got rid of their USB and Ethernet ports while the rest of the first world still uses them, forcing people to get adapters. It’s really a testament to how much people love their products that they are still so successful.  A lesser product definitely couldn’t do something like this.

    What’s Their Goal?

     

    I already mentioned how it’s very difficult for iPhone users to access the battery (that’s where we come in) and Apple wants it that way. They don’t want you to be able to swap out your battery for a new one because they want you to go to them for that service.

    Better yet, they don’t want you to fix your iPhone after it starts showing it age, they want you to get a new one. We’re seeing it in products everywhere, people don’t stich up their clothes as much as they used to, or take as much care of their car, or even swap out a hard drive for a new one! People just get a new one.

    Once people are accustomed to getting a new phone every couple of years, it’s not wasteful – it’s just what you do. 

    “Right to Repair”

     

    Apple (among other big tech companies) has been lobbying against the “Fair Repair Act” for the last few years. The bill would require companies like Apple to sell tools and replacement parts, and perhaps even guides, so that customers can repair their phones and computers.

    That sounds like something we wouldn’t really want either, but we don’t mind this bill at all.

    Let’s face it, a lot of people just want to have an expert handle it. I can change my own oil, but I’ll usually have it done at a Jiffy Lube or a Sears Auto. Just because customers will have more access to the tools and parts to fix their computers and phones, doesn’t mean they’ll stop coming to us.

    In fact, there are plenty of guides on how to replace iPhone screens online, but it requires delicate care, and often some tools that people don’t have. That’s why so many people choose to come to repair shops like us.

    Apple is opposing this legislation because they want to make their phones nearly impossible to fix by repair shops like us. Forcing you to go to them for repairs is only part of it, because they don’t actually want you to fix your phone, they want you to get a new phone entirely.

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Ask A Medic

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  • The Infamous nVidia Chipset Issue

    by Arthur Zilbermann Posted February 14, 2012 in Ask a Medic, Computer, Graphics Card
    Question:

    I’ve heard my laptop has a bad nVidia Graphics Chip. What does this mean?

    Answer:

    The images you see on your computer when playing video games, editing photos or movies, or even just surfing the web, are all made possible by your graphics chip. Without it, you can kiss any enjoyable/productive/gainful computer times goodbye. If you notice your screen has been freezing, flickering, showing a bad resolution, or in extreme cases, has gone completely black, you may have a bad graphics chip. The good news is if you have an nVidia chipset issue, you’re not alone. The bad news is that the problem is a difficult one to fix. The graphics chip in question is soldered directly onto the motherboard, the part of your laptop that holds your memory, processor, and all the circuits that make it go. Because of a fault in production, some nVidia based chipsets (especially in Macbooks) tend to overheat and cause the motherboard to warp, ever so slightly, and the chips attached to it to start peeling off. Once this happens, the only real fix is to replace the motherboard. Some laptop manufacturers have actually recognized this issue and are offering warranty service or motherboard replacement free of charge, so contact your manufacturer to find out more. If that’s not an option, we can perform a micro-solder fix on your motherboard that could keep it running for years, or months. Since this is not something we recommend, we currently don’t offer any warranties on these jobs. It’s a last-chance operation, and doesn’t resolve the core issue, making the problem likely to come back.

    As long as you want your laptop to remain functional, it’s important that your graphics chip is in tip-top shape. Fortunately for you, here at Laptop MD+, we wield tiny screwdrivers with unparalleled grace and expertise and can get your motherboard replaced in no time. Learn more about your graphics chip and request a completely free quote here. We’ll get your computer up and running again before you have time to despair!

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Knowledge Base

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  • The Differerence Between SSD and HDD

    Posted November 2, 2011 in Hardware Tips & Tricks
    Problem:

    There's a lot of talk these days about SSD and HDD drives. To the computer tech, the difference may be clear but to the average lay person confusion may be the only thing clear. What's difference between SSD and HDD drives? I'm glad you asked...

    MD+ Diagnosis:

    HDD (Hard Disk Drives) hard drives are traditional hard drives with moving parts, proven to shocks and vibrations which cause can damage, that have been used for decades. SSD (Solid State Drives) hard drives are modern alternatives that are used more in portable devices than normal computers to cut down on weight, save space and maximize performance. SSD drives are commonly found in more compact situations, boot up quicker, and use less battery power. You will find SSD drives in any device that says it runs on 'flash memory' like a smartphone, tablet, or other portable device.

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Recent Knowledge

Breakroom

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  • Take A Virtual Tour of LaptopMD+

    by Arthur Zilbermann Posted November 8, 2011 in Water Cooler

    Virtual Tour of LaptopMD+Never been to LaptopMD+ or haven’t stopped by since we last remodeled our offices? Take the LaptopMD+ Virtual Tour and explore our offices interactively. Google stopped by and used their patented street maps technology in our office and the result is a beautiful 360-degree tour of our spacious digs. From our location above Penn Station to your internet browser, check out our offices before you come by!

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Recent Breakroom

News

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  • Laptop MD joins forces with Data Recovery Clinic !

    by Arthur Zilbermann Posted June 7, 2013 in Computer Maintenance, data recovery, hard-drive, LaptopMD+ News, News, Newsletter, Small Business Support, virus

    We are excited to announce that Laptop MD now has joined forces with Data Recovery Clinic.  Steven, the lead technician at Data Recovery Clinic, has been providing emergency data recovery from hard drives and raids of all configurations for over 23 years.

    DRC, established in 1989, attributes their high success rate  due to their cutting edge ATOLA data recovery equipment and highly trained technicians in data recovery. They have successfully recovered data from all over the globe and from all types of media. If your data can be recovered, then they can recover it. If you don’t believe us, just ask: NASA, 3M, Lucent, Pepsi Co, Chicago Stock Exchange, Sandia National Labs, CAGEMA INC, Raytheon, Dell, HP, IBM, Compaq, Norton Utilities, and many, many more whose data they have successfully recovered.

    With their “no-data no-charge payment system”, it’s a win-win for anyone who has been faced with the disastrous failed hard drive, flash card, or memory stick at the most critical moment. Come to Laptop MD and let us battle “Murphy’s Law” for you.

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